Tag Archives: Human

Ripples

Fact: Starting October 2012, Sheridan college is starting to charge 3 dollars to park after 3:00 pm for those part-time students who do not have permits (Parking Policies). It has been free for all this while… so why change it now?

Well, to answer that question, let me ask you this one: Are higher education establishments becoming money-grabbing institutions? I mean, you have to admit that the cost of pursuing higher education (either via College or University) is ridiculously expensive, like for instance investing in textbooks that will become obsolete in under a year.

Now what does this have to do with “ripples” you ask? Well remember that it only takes a drop of water to cause ripples in a vast body of water… so maybe it will only take a cumulation of small changes like this to start off the vehicle of change. What do you think? Have we, the masses, become mindless drones so overwhelmed with the regular bustle of life that we fail to think critically? Critically enough to push for changes?

You tell me.

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The Corner

A place where if a snake was backed into, would instantly strike viciously at its attacker(s). It is a well coined expression based on this absolute truth of what actually happens. So this begs the question, do we humans always strike back without a second thought if faced with a similar predicament to that of the snake?

I believe it is instinctual, ingrained in our basic need to survive. But, can we ever overcome that instinct with out intellect and squash that behaviour if we feel it to be self destructive? Sounds like an intellect vs. instinct topic doesn’t it.

So I will leave with this: What will happen if one is backed into a corner? An even scarier notion, what if that person had nothing to lose?

Propelling Michael Phelps

Right now I’m watching a news broadcast on the jaw dropping (and not in a good way) results of Michael Phelps’ 400 IM event in the London 2012 Olympics; the same prodigy athlete who dominated swimming in the 2008 Olympics. Now when I say dominated, I mean won by a ridiculous amount of time, every single time. It really was a genuine treat to witness such mind-numbing, perpetually achieved victories. But oh how the tides have turned. According to the article “London 2012: Michael Phelps admits he swam a ‘crappy race’ vs. Ryan Lochte” in the National Post, Lochte beat Phelps by 4 seconds in the 400 IM event. Yikes!

Now back to the broadcast. The anchors and specialists were not only talking about how disappointed fans must have been, but also touched on the reason as to why the disappointment was so intense. Ever since that picture of Phelps smoking marijuana surfaced, his career and reputation took a nosedive. They went on to state that the North American culture is to “propel people on a pedestal too quickly”, thus causing an intense negative reaction when they fail to meet our standards…

To me, this sounds all too familiar as I did write about a similar subject in a previous post of mine called The Plight that is Teaching. Needless to say, I could not stop grinning as I witnessed this theme weaving its way through this broadcast and how it was taken one step further. In my post, I had talked about how we tend to do this to our teachers, but of course this can be applied to our idols whether they are celebrities or teachers.

To be honest, I think we need to keep things in perspective and not put our idols through ridiculous standards. Once we realize that they are indeed human beings as well, we don’t risk suffering needless, severe blow to our psyche.

The Plight that is Teaching

I finally did finish that yoga book.  Finally right!?  Upon completion, I realized that I didn’t learn who my true self was because I already knew who I was.  Needless to say, I definitely came up with a few conclusions of my own.  However, instead of boring you to death with my epiphanies or “A HA” moments, I’d rather talk about the following quote which hit me like a ton of bricks.  Well, at least that’s what it felt like.

“As soon as we begin idealizing our teachers, craving their powers, wishing to participate in the glow of their sidhus**, it wont be too many months or years until we begin to devalue them.  If we make them into gods, we will eventually see them as devils.”  (©Stephen Cope: pg. 294)

The fact of the matter is that this underlying truth resides within the yoga world and in the real one.  Think about it, how many of us instantly devalue someone on top because of a simple and small mistake? It’s mostly people in power and, to most of us, these authority figures are our teachers.  Let me clarify what I mean when I say “teacher”.  Our teachers aren’t just the ones found in a classroom. Oh heavens no. In fact, they reside in the most obvious places like our very homes or just down the street.  You see, learning doesn’t JUST happen in a school, but with those who share in the experiences we have while living.  Therefore, teachers could be anyone who we learnt something from.  Kind of a “duh” definition isn’t it.

The problem arises when we start to idolize them, putting them on a pedestal because of their apparent “perfection”.  I’m sure that everyone’s heard the saying “no one’s perfect”, and yet we tend to think that way regardless of how many times that expression is drilled into our heads. It’s the scariest thing when you suddenly realize that, hey, everyone has his or her own flaws.  You want to know what I think?  I know you do.  I honestly believe that we want to emulate that “perfect teacher” in our lives because we strive to be that picture of perfection.  The sad part is that when that picture crumbles, when that teacher fails us, we completely rip them away from us.  That is when they get the worst press, their lives dragged through the mud because of a terrible blunder on their part.  It’s like they say, those who are at the top usually fall harder.

The trick here is to not equate them to gods, to not put them on a pedestal.  They will err, they will trip and fall, but the important thing is that we learnt something important from them.  The lesson needs to stand on its own, personified and separated from the teacher in order to learn.  If we start associating one with the other and as a result idealize that teacher, there presents that risk of turning our once admired teachers into little devils.

**In yoga terminology, sidhu powers are achieved once the mind is focused on elevating oneself on the chakra ladder so to speak.